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(225) 955-3416 | dheitman@theadvocate.com

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About Danny Heitman

Danny Heitman is an award-winning columnist for The Advocate newspaper in Louisiana, the paper’s editorial page editor, and a nationally recognized cultural commentator and author.  He’s also served as an adjunct professor at LSU’s Manship School of Mass Communication.

He wrote editorials for a series of commentaries on justice reform that was a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize.

In addition to his work for The Advocate, Danny frequently writes essays and reviews for national publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Smithsonian and Humanities magazine. He’s a regular columnist for Phi Kappa Phi Forum Magazine.

Two of his essays have been recognized as Notable Essays of the Year in Hoghton Mifflin’s annual “Best American Essays” series, which recognizes the best nonfiction from around the nation.

In 2008, LSU Press published Danny’s first book, “A Summer of Birds: John James Audubon at Oakley House,” which explores a pivotal season in the life of the world’s most famous bird artist. The book was adapted as a 2009 public television documentary, and Danny served as an associate producer for the project, which was nominated for an Emmy award. He’s also participated in three other Audubon documentaries, including “Rara Avis,”  directed by acclaimed filmmaker Al Reniert. You can learn about the book here.

 Danny’s weekly “At Random” column typically explores his life as a husband and father. His essays for national audiences have touched on a variety of topics, but he often considers the intersections of literature, nature, history and civic life.

Danny has written about the craft of writing for The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and he’s  been asked to share his insights on popular culture on National Public Radio and the BBC. He’s frequently lectured around the country, including two stints as a lecturer for The National Endowment for the Humanities.  

Danny lives in Baton Rouge with his wife. Their two children, now grown and on their own, continue to inform his essays.